BETHANY COLLEGE PROFESSOR TO PRESENT PAPER TO C.S. LEWIS FOUNDATION

BETHANY, W.Va. — Assistant Professor of Communication, Michael D. King, will present his paper, “The Crises Of The University: A Personal Crises?” at the C.S. Lewis Foundation and the Center for Western Civilizations’ annual National Faculty Forum in October. The theme for this year’s symposium is “The Crises of the University: Religion and the Future of the Academy.” The event will be held at the University of Colorado in Boulder.

“It’s a personal and professional honor for me to represent Bethany College to the C.S. Lewis Foundation,” said King. “My unique experience and position as a professor of communication and academic credentials in theology and education was crucial in their decision to invite me.”

King’s paper explores the legitimacy and importance of religiously informed thought and expression within the curricular life of mainstream academia and how a personal ownership in spiritual formation can help advise students in mind, body, and spirit. The paper also explores the biases of secular and pseudo religious tolerance in academia towards religious thought and expression.

King has over twenty-seven years experience in both electronic and print media and holds undergraduate and graduate degrees in theology and religious education from International Seminary and Wheeling Jesuit University. He joined the communication department at Bethany College in 2003 and is coordinator for the public relations and graphic design concentrations. He is also faculty advisor to The Student Publication Center, advising the weekly student newspaper, The Tower, and annual publications The Bethanian and The Folio.

Inspired by the life and legacy of C.S. Lewis, author of Mere Christianity, The Screwtape Letters, The Great Divorce and The Chronicles of Narnia, The C.S. Lewis Foundation, a non-partisan – non-sectarian foundation, was formed in 1972 in order to advance the renewal of Christian scholarship and artistic expression throughout mainstream colleges and universities.