Interdisciplinary Studies Overview & Goals

Complex problems require interdisciplinary approaches if valid solutions are to be found. Interdisciplinary Studies at Bethany College is a program that responds to this need. It houses courses, majors, and minors that cross departmental lines. Majors and minors can be student-initiated or faculty-sponsored. The program, designed to create a broader array of educational opportunities, assists individual students to design, propose, and complete a coherent, individualized, interdisciplinary degree program that is not currently available at Bethany. Similarly, faculty are invited to propose new interdisciplinary programs to serve the needs of their students.

Current faculty-initiated interdisciplinary majors include: Education and Psychology; Environmental Science; German Studies; International Economics with Study Abroad; International Relations; Music Technology; and Psychology, Religion and Culture. Minors are offered in Medieval and Renaissance Studies; Nonprofit Management; Nonprofit Marketing, and Women’s Studies.

Environmental Science (Major)

International Relations (Major)

Music Technology (Major)
The new Bachelor of Arts in Music Technology provides the student with a firm foundation in the creation, performance, presentation, and recording of music in a variety of contexts: live, audio and video recording, and internet streaming. Internships provide experience with an off-campus recording studio, media organization, communication agency, or professional performance groups for the Music Technology Major. On-campus events also give Music Technology students opportunities in performance, composition, audio recording, and live sound applications.

Psychology and Education (Major)

Psychology, Religion and Culture (Major)

Medieval and Renaissance Studies (Minor)

Nonprofit Management (Minor)

Nonprofit Marketing (Minor)

Women’s Studies (Minor)

Careers Interdisciplinary Studies

Audio recording and production
Video recording and production
Music editing
Sound engineer

Whitney Wilding Hughes“It was Bethany’s emphasis on foreign languages and study abroad that laid the foundation I needed for my career in international development.”

Whitney Wilding Hughes, Interdisciplinary Studies/International Relations ’07
Deputy Regional Director for West & Central Africa, Viamo

Paul Turner“Thanks to its liberal arts tradition, Bethany College gave me the academic flexibility to declare my own major through the interdisciplinary studies program. Rather than confine myself to one discipline, I participated in several which opened up my graduate school possibilities and prepared me for a career in the non-profit, corporate and public policy sectors. I’ve found that the knowledge and skills attained at Bethany, along with its long-standing emphasis on communication, translates to essential leadership qualities and opportunities. Bethany allowed me to pursue my passion, and to link my academic program to it. Even at mid-career, that passion has never been compromised because of the foundation received at Bethany.”

Paul Turner, Interdisciplinary Studies ’90
Economic and Leadership Development Consultant with Global Ministries of the Christian Church (Disciples of Christ) and United Church of Christ in the Democratic Republic of the Congo

Faculty

Brooke Lemmons Deal
Associate Professor of Religious Studies, Co-Chair of the Department of Humanities and Co-Director of Interdisciplinary Studies
Ph.D., Brite Divinity School
M.Th., Brite Divinity School
B.A., Southwest Missouri State University
304.829.7718
bdeal@bethanywv.edu

Harald J. A. Menz
Professor of World Languages & Cultures, Co-Chair of the Department of Humanities and Co-Director of Interdisciplinary Studies
M.A., Ph.D., West Virginia University
B.A., Padagogische Hochschule, Heidelberg, West Germany
304.829.7915
hmenz@bethanywv.edu

Requirements

BIOL 100, 108 or 110, 180, 221, 228, 231, 326, 343, 378, 379; CHEM 101, 102, 211, and either 315 or 335, with 335 preferred; GENS 202, 204, 220, 225; MATH 281 and 282, or PSYC 205 and 207; PHYS 103, or PHYS 201 and 202; INTD 490. Recommended electives; ACCT 222; BIOL 168, 169, 425; CHEM 324; ECON 163; GENS 204; INTD 202; MATH 201; PHIL 124; POLS 253, 320, 325; PSYC 287; SOCI 150.

ECON 113, 162, 163, 260; HIST 101, 102, 314; one course selected from INTD 202, 203, 204, 253, 306; MATH 281; POLS 120, 243, 325, 341, 351, 352, 370; nine credits in courses in a world language beyond the 130 level, including either 220 or 221(international students whose native language is not English may substitute for this world language requirement one course to enhance English language proficiency chosen from COMM 206, ENGL 212, 220, 230, 240, THEA 120, 221, or 226, and one course to promote understanding of contemporary American culture chosen from ENGL 250, 383, 385, HIST 202, 355, POLS 225, PSYC 250, or THEA 335); INTD 490.

COMM 101, COMM 200, COMM 218, COMM/MUSI 309, COMM 420; One of the following courses: COMM 392, COMM 393, COMM 395.

MUSI 100: applied lessons in an instrument for 2 semesters (1 credit each semester); MUSI 101; MUSI 104; ensemble credit (MUSI 105, 106, or 107) for 2 semesters (1 credit each semester); COMM/MUSI 110, MUSI 114, COMM/MUSI 210; one course from either MUSI 103, MUSI 250 or MUSI 251; MUSI 171; MUSI 477; INTD 490.

PSYC 100, 205, 315, 477; two courses selected from PSYC 324, 325, 326; EDUC 203; EDUC 242, 348, 473; PSYC 470; SOCI 150, 210; INTD 490.

INTD 204, 490; PHIL 355, PSYC 100, PSYC 188, PSYC 230 or 231, PSYC 324 or 325, PSYC 328 or 329; RELS 220, 224, 235, 251; SOWO 120.

Fifteen credits including INTD 252; one course from the following: ENGL 245; FREN 320, FREN 420, or GRMN 420; one course from the following: ENGL 270, ENGL 440, ENGL 444, or other courses in the series ENGL 400-449 focusing on topics pertinent to the Middle Ages or Renaissance or both (as approved by the Director of Interdisciplinary Studies); one course from the following: MUSI 250, VISA 100, VISA 101, GENS 353 or PHIL 353, ENGL 320, HIST 311, courses in the series HIST 410-419 focusing on topics pertinent to the Middle Ages or Renaissance or both (as approved by the Director of Interdisciplinary Studies), POLS 361, one 3-credit independent study on a relevant topic taken at Bethany (with prior approval of the Director of Interdisciplinary Studies), or one 3-credit course on a relevant subject not included in the Bethany curriculum transferred to Bethany from another college (with approval of the Director of Interdisciplinary Studies).

INTD 175, 320; ACCT 202, 203; PSYC/BUSI/ECON 287; ENGL 220; COMM 203; three credits from BUSI 482 or PHIL 124; COMM 206, 303; BUSI 311; ENGL 223; MATH 281 or PSYC 205.

INTD 175, 320; ACCT 202, 203; ENGL 220; COMM/BUSI 203, 412; BUSI 310 (ECON 163 is a prerequite for BUSI 310).

Fifteen credits from the following courses: BIOL 115; COMM 346; ENGL 320, 321, 385, 434; INTD 204, 211; PSYC 210; RELS 101; SOCI 145; one 3-credit independent study in an appropriate subject taken at Bethany (with prior approval of the Director of Interdisciplinary Studies); one 3-credit course focusing on a relevant subject not included in the Bethany curriculum transferred to Bethany from another college (with approval of the Director of Interdisciplinary Studies).

Course Descriptions

INTD 175 Nonprofit Management Fundamentals   3 credits
This course provides the foundation content and theoretical basis for nonprofit management through a comprehensive picture of current issues in managing nonprofit organizations. Topics include: principles of strategic and long-range planning; program development and evaluation; recruiting, organizing, motivating, and retaining volunteers/staff; development of financial assets and fundraising; developing recruiting, and working with a board of directors; and effective proposal writing.

INTD 202 World Energy Resources   3 credits
This course is an analysis of energy resources and needs of the modern world in historical and geographical context. Psychological, social, and political ramifications are examined and alternative solutions to energy problems are evaluated. Not open to First-Year Students.

INTD 203 International Terrorism   3 credits
This course is a study of the origins, nature, cost, containment, and prevention of terrorism, violence, and revolution in today’s world, focusing in particular on the reasons why many nations and peoples outside the ruling classes of the major developed nations turn to violence. Not open to First-Year Students.

INTD 204 Human Sexuality   3 credits
This course is an examination of issues concerning sexuality and sexual functioning. Considered are the following topics: biological, psychological, and sociological aspects of sexuality; the development of sex roles; sexual myths; sexuality and religion; birth control; changing sex roles in today’s world.

INTD 210 The Art and Science of Peace   3 credits
This course is a consideration of the use of various forms of art throughout history to convey themes of peace and an examination of psychological, sociological, and religious research designed to promote peace. Students in the course produce original works of art which express personal visions of peace. An additional course fee is required.

INTD 211 Women of the World   3 credits
This course is an international study of women’s issues, focusing on women in the global economy, reproductive rights, domestic abuse, civic duties, HIV/AIDS, genital mutilation, and Sharia law. Contemporary issues pertaining to women in such countries as China, Japan, South Africa, Nigeria, Afghanistan, and Mexico are compared to promote understanding of and broaden perspectives on the lives of women outside the United States.

INTD 251 Origins of Western Thought I: The Ancient World   3 credits
This course is an examination of intellectual life in the civilizations of Ancient Greece and Rome. It explores characteristic cultural themes and values by focusing on differing perceptions of the hero and on the manifestations of those perceptions in representative written and visual forms. This course is one of a series of three courses examining the development of thought in the Western world. Each course is offered every third semester. Not open to First-Year Students.

INTD 252 Origins of Western Thought II: The Middle Ages and Renaissance   3 credits
This course is an examination of thought in Europe during the Middle Ages and Renaissance. It explores characteristic cultural themes and values by focusing on differing perceptions of the relationship between the sacred and the profane and on the manifestations of those perceptions in representative written and visual forms. This course is one of a series of three courses examining the development of thought in the Western world. Each course is offered every third semester. Not open to First-Year Students.

INTD 253 Origins of Western Thought III: The Modern Age   3 credits
This course is an examination of modern thought as it has developed in the Western world from the 17th century to the present. It explores characteristic cultural themes and values by focusing on the emergence of a rationalist vision and of reactions to that vision by exploring representative written and visual examples. This course is one of a series of three courses examining the development of thought in the Western world. Each course is offered every third semester. Not open to First-Year Students.

INTD 301-302 Heuristics   3 credits each
These courses focus on the investigation and discovery of methodologies of problem solving within a broad spectrum of academic disciplines and pragmatic pursuits. Open to juniors and seniors only. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor.

INTD 306 International Development   3 credits
This course is interdisciplinary in structure and examines the economic, political, and social development of Lesser Developed Countries. A major focus of the course is the environment and “sustainable development.” When taught as a travel course, it consists of classes and meetings with political, IGO, and NGO officials and staff. Students gain knowledge of development at the local level by traveling to villages and talking with citizens and local leaders. Students participate in environmental research and conservation activities.

INTD 320 Nonprofit Field Study   3 credits
In this course, students have the opportunity to apply skills learned in the classroom and solidify their interest in nonprofit management. This experience also provides an opportunity for development of a professional identity and possible contacts for the future.

INTD 487-488 Independent Study   2-4 credits

INTD 490 Senior Project   2-4 credits