Social Work Overview & Goals

The Social Work program has been accredited by the Council on Social Work Education [CSWE] since 1984 and is the only accredited social work program in a private liberal arts college in the state of West Virginia. Graduates who complete the program in good standing are eligible for advanced standing in any MSW program accredited by the CSWE and can complete the MSW in as little as one year.

The study of Social Work offers students a broad range of career opportunities in a variety of field settings, including public welfare agencies, schools, hospitals, nursing homes, nonprofit agencies, psychiatric facilities, drug and alcohol treatment centers, prisons, probation offices, and other social welfare settings. The department offers a major in Social Work, a dual major in Psychology and Social Work with a Human Services or Scientific emphasis, and a minor in Criminal Justice.

Social Work Mission: Based in the context of liberal arts education and the generalist model, the Social Work Program prepares students for beginning-level, professional social work practice in all practice settings. This preparation focuses on assisting the socially and economically oppressed client populations from both urban and rural areas within the tri-state area of the Upper Ohio Valley. Program implementation is founded in a humanizing orientation growing out of the historical roots of social work. It is designed to support the development of a lifelong social conscience and commitment to continual professional development that reflects a respect for human dignity, diversity, and commitment to social justice.

Social Work Program Goals:

  1. To prepare students for beginning level, generalist social work practice within the framework of the NASW Code of Ethics.
  2. To prepare students to work with populations affected by oppression and discrimination and to advocate for social and economic justice.
  3. To prepare students with a solid educational foundation for graduate education and continued professional growth and development.

Course credit will not be awarded for previous work or volunteer experience.

For more information about the Social Work program, go to our Facebook page.

 

Social Work (Major)

Criminal Justice (Minor)

The Service Learning Center

The Bethany College Service Learning Center is housed in the social work department. Established in 2010 with a grant from PNC Foundation, the Service Learning Center provides assistance to students and faculty members who are interested in developing and performing service projects for non-profit organizations in the tri-state area.

The mission of the Bethany College Service Learning Center is to help students combine meaningful community service with their own educational experiences in order to teach civic responsibility and promote a greater understanding of the community. By archiving campus efforts to engage in service learning, the Center aims to use these experiences to promote community service growth while giving students and faculty the opportunity to take the classroom to the community.

Service learning differs from community service or volunteer work. The meaningful difference comes from the symbiotic relationship that forms between community organizations and students or participants. While cleaning up trash along a river bank is considered to be volunteer work, service learning might require a student to pick up trash, categorize the types of trash found, and develop and maintain a recycling program for a community based on those findings. It is an extremely comprehensive learning experience that aids local organizations and agencies in their efforts to maintain their organization and achieve its goals while bettering the community and providing a hands-on learning experience that enriches classroom teachings.

It is only with your help that such a long-lasting relationship can be formed and a betterment of the community can be achieved. Please contact us today to find out more about what we do and how we can work with your organization to integrate the classroom into the community.

WHAT IS SERVICE LEARNING?

“If students remove trash from a streambed, they are providing a service to the community as volunteers…When students remove trash from a streambed, analyze what they found, share the results and offer suggestions for the neighborhood to reduce pollution and reflect on their experience…THAT is service learning!” –Learn and Serve Clearinghouse

Student Benefits
Service learning improves academic achievement by providing students with the ability to practice  what they are learning and develop a stronger understanding of the community and their  role in it. Students become engaged emotionally through exploring their values and beliefs while developing a sense of  personal responsibility. Students also establish relationships with local agencies which provides experience for building resumes and networking for future employment.

Organization and Community Benefits
Working with Bethany College students and faculty on service-learning projects will have long-lasting benefits for an organization. Service learning activities take service to a new level, as they provide meaningful changes in an agency’s ability to fundraise, write grants, and provide services to consumers. Faculty members can share knowledge, expertise, and resources, while students work side by side with agency staff to help agencies grow.

How will we select a student worker for our agency?

You can either contact us directly by phone, e-mail, or an agency request form. This form enables you to advertise any opportunities you may have for service learning to the students and enables the Center to pair you with a student who can enhance his or her education by assisting your agency.

Will we decide how long the student worker would be with us or will the course instructor decide the duration of the placement/project?

This duration of a service learning project will be negotiated by the professor and the agency. Both parties need to consider the project requirements, student availability, and the length of the semester. For projects integrated with academic coursework, projects will be evaluated at the end of each semester for grading purposes.

What forms, including liability forms, are we responsible for completing?

Participating agencies must sign a waiver of liability as well as a memorandum of understanding with the SLC. Other forms may be required at the discretion of the Service Learning Center, including student evaluation forms.

If we have project needs that do not meet service learning requirements, would the Service Learning Center help us convert it to a service learning project?

Yes, the Service Learning Center could provide examples as well as ideas for any projects your agency may have in mind.

Can students be compensated for their work with our agency?

No. Students cannot be compensated for their work during a service learning project or internship.

Will students be available every semester to work at our agency?

The Service Learning Center cannot guarantee student availability.

Will all projects and placements be in conjunction with an academic course or can students complete self-designed, service learning work?

Students can complete self-designed service learning projects, but these must be pre-approved by a course instructor or their academic advisor. All service learning projects must reflect the use of information or skills gleaned from the student’s major field of study.

Will students be completing more than one project or placement at a time? Can students complete work at multiple agencies?

The number of assignments a student takes on is dependent on the student’s course and work schedule. If time permits and the student is interested, he or she may be involved in more than one project during a semester.

Is the student responsible for providing his/her own transportation?

The College does have vans available for group travel. Such reservations are at the discretion of the professor; if the professor does not reserve transportation, the student is responsible for providing his or her own transportation.

If we have no need for assistance during a certain semester, are we still eligible to receive students for service learning opportunities in the future?

Yes. We are always looking for new projects and ideas. We welcome your agency’s input and will do our best to fulfill agency needs as they arise.

Information for Transfer Students

If you are currently enrolled at West Virginia Northern Community College, Belmont Technical College, or Eastern Gateway Community College, see your transfer student advisor to learn about the Transfer Incentive Program (TIP) for commuting students. Curriculums are in place to ease the transfer process and save you time and money completing your BSW degree!

If you are transferring from another school, please contact Professor Shelek-Furbee at kfurbee@bethanywv.edu or 304.829.7189 for assistance. She will work with you to develop a graduation plan that maximizes the transfer of credits from your current school and will help you develop a graduation plan.

Careers in Social Work

Public Welfare
Administration and Planning
Case Management
Program Evaluation
Policy Development
Research

Criminal/Justice Corrections
Counseling/Therapy
Rehabilitation
Probation
Parole
Youth Services
Victim Assistance
Drug Prevention

School Social Work
Counseling
Case Management
Pupil Personnel Services
Student Advocacy
Instruction
Assessment
Referral

Clinical
Counseling/Therapy: Individual, Group, Famly
Assessment
Case Management
Crisis Intervention
Program Planning

Administration
Management
Policy Development
Planning
Supervision
Fundraising
Budgeting
Grant Writing
Advocacy
Evaluation

Research and Education
Research
Teaching
Grant Writing
Supervision

Occupational
Counseling
Education
Wellness Promotion
Organizational Development
Assessment
Human Resources

Healthcare
Case Management
Counseling
Prevention and Education
Program Development
Administration
Research
Child Life Specialists
Hospice Care
Rehabilitation
Wellness Promotion

Community Organization
Program and Community Development
Advocacy
Politics
Education
Planning

Gerontology
Advocacy/Intervention
Counseling
Case Management
Programming
Public Policy
Administration

Child Welfare
Case Management
Advocacy
Intervention
Supervision

Developmental Disabilities
Case Management
Program Planning and Evaluation
Research
Policy Development
Advocacy

International Social Work
Humanitarian Services
Advocacy
Education
Wellness Promotion
Development: Economic and Community
Disaster/Disease Relief
Volunteer Coordination
Program Administration
Clinical Practice
Policy Development
Research

Baccalaureate Social Work Program
Assessment of Student Learning Outcomes

This form is used to assist the COA [Council on Accreditation] in the evaluation of the program’s compliance with the accreditation standards below:

B4.0.2 The program provides its most recent year of summary data and outcomes for the assessment of each of the identified competencies, specifying the percentage of students achieving program benchmarks for each program option. 


B4.0.3 The program uses Form AS 4(B) and/or Form AS 4(M) to report its most recent assessment outcomes for each program option to constituents and the public on its website and routinely up-dates (minimally every 2 years) its findings.

All Council on Social Work Education programs measure and report student learning outcomes. Students are assessed on their mastery of the competencies that comprise the accreditation standards of the Council on Social Work Education. These competencies are dimensions of social work practice that all social workers are expected to master during their professional training. A measurement benchmark is set by the social work programs for each competency. An assessment score at or above that benchmark is considered by the program to represent mastery of that particular competency.

Outcomes Table: [n=8]

Measure #1-Exam
Measure #2-Portfolio
Measure #3-Field Evaluation

Competency Competency Benchmark Percentage of Students Achieving Benchmark/ Measure Percentage of Students Achieving Benchmark/ Competency
1. Demonstrate Ethical and Professional Behavior Measure #1- 75%
Measure #2- 75%
Measure #3- 75%
Measure #1- 98
Measure #2- 98
Measure #3- 100
99%
2. Engage Diversity and Difference in Practice Measure #1- 75%
Measure #2- 75%
Measure #3- 75%
Measure #1 – 92
Measure #2 – 100
Measure #3 – 100
97%
3. Advance Human Rights and Social, Economic, and Environmental Justice Measure #1- 75%
Measure #2- 75%
Measure #3- 75%
Measure #1 – 88
Measure #2 – 100
Measure #3 – 100
96%
4. Engage in Research-Informed Practice and Practice-Informed Research Measure #1- 75%
Measure #2- 75%
Measure #3- 75%
Measure #1 – 100
Measure #2 – 100
Measure #3 – 100
100%
5. Engage in Policy Practice Measure #1- 75%
Measure #2- 75%
Measure #3- 75%
Measure #1 – 100
Measure #2 – 96
Measure #3 – 100
93%
6. Engage with Individuals, Families, Groups, Organizations, and Communities Measure #1- 75%
Measure #2- 75%
Measure #3- 75%
Measure #1 – 100
Measure #2 – 100
Measure #3 – 100
100%
7. Assess Individuals, Families, Groups, Organizations, and Communities Measure #1- 75%
Measure #2- 75%
Measure #3- 75%
Measure #1 – 100
Measure #2 – 100
Measure #3 – 100
100%
8. Intervene with Individuals, Families, Groups, Organizations, and Communities Measure #1- 75%
Measure #2- 75%
Measure #3- 75%
Measure #1 – 100
Measure #2 – 100
Measure #3 – 100
100%
9. Evaluate Practice with Individuals, Families, Groups, Organizations, and Communities Measure #1- 75%
Measure #2- 75%
Measure #3- 75%
Measure #1 – 100
Measure #2 – 100
Measure #3 – 94
98%

This form is used to assist the COA [Council on Accreditation] in the evaluation of the program’s compliance with the accreditation standards below:

4.0.2 The program provides summary data and outcomes for the assessment of each of its competencies, identifying the percentage of students achieving the benchmark.

4.0.4 The program uses Form AS 4 (B) and/or AS4 (M) to report assessment outcomes to its constituents and the public on its website and routinely up-dates (minimally every 2 years) these postings

All Council on Social Work Education programs measure and report student learning outcomes. Students are assessed on their mastery of the competencies that comprise the accreditation standards of the Council on Social Work Education. These competencies are dimensions of social work practice that all social workers are expected to master during their professional training. A measurement benchmark is set by the social work programs for each competency. An assessment score at or above that benchmark is considered by the program to represent mastery of that particular competency.

Outcomes Table: [n=20]

Measure #1-Exam
Measure #2-Portfolio
Measure #3-Field Evaluation

Competency Competency Benchmark Percentage of Students Achieving Benchmark/ Measure Percentage of Students Achieving Benchmark/ Competency
1. Identify as a Professional Social Worker Measure #1- 75%
Measure #2- 75%
Measure #3- 75%
Measure #1- 100
Measure #2- 100
Measure #3- 100
100%
2. Apply Ethical Principles Measure #1- 75%
Measure #2- 75%
Measure #3- 75%
Measure #1 – 95
Measure #2 – 97
Measure #3 – 100
100%
3. Apply Critical Thinking Measure #1- 75%
Measure #2- 75%
Measure #3- 75%
Measure #1 – 93
Measure #2 – 98
Measure #3 – 100
100%
4. Engage Diversity in Practice Measure #1- 75%
Measure #2- 75%
Measure #3- 75%
Measure #1 – 96
Measure #2 – 100
Measure #3 – 100
100%
5. Advance Human Rights/Social and Economic Justice Measure #1- 75%
Measure #2- 75%
Measure #3- 75%
Measure #1 – 83
Measure #2 – 98
Measure #3 – 98
100%
6. Engage Research Informed Practice/Practice 7Informed Research Measure #1- 75%
Measure #2- 75%
Measure #3- 75%
Measure #1 – 85
Measure #2 – 100
Measure #3 – 100
100%
7. Apply Human Behavior Knowledge Measure #1- 75%
Measure #2- 75%
Measure #3- 75%
Measure #1 – 88
Measure #2 – 100
Measure #3 – 100
96%
8. Engage Policy Practice to Advance Well-Being and Deliver Services Measure #1- 75%
Measure #2- 75%
Measure #3- 75%
Measure #1 – 98
Measure #2 – 100
Measure #3 – 100
99%
9. Respond to Practice Contexts Measure #1- 75%
Measure #2- 75%
Measure #3- 75%
Measure #1 – 80
Measure #2 – 100
Measure #3 – 100
93%
10A. Practice Engagement Measure #1- 75%
Measure #2- 75%
Measure #3- 75%
Measure #1 – 93
Measure #2 – 94
Measure #3 – 100
96%
10B. Practice Assessment Measure #1- 75%
Measure #2- 75%
Measure #3- 75%
Measure #1 – 86
Measure #2 – 93
Measure #3 – 100
93%
10C. Practice Intervention Measure #1- 75%
Measure #2- 75%
Measure #3- 75%
Measure #1 – 95
Measure #2 – 93
Measure #3 – 98
95%
10D. Practice Evaluation Measure #1- 75%
Measure #2- 75%
Measure #3- 75%
Measure #1- 90
Measure #2- 88
Measure #3- 90
89%

 

This form is used to assist the COA [Council on Accreditation] in the evaluation of the program’s compliance with the accreditation standards below:

4.0.2 The program provides summary data and outcomes for the assessment of each of its competencies, identifying the percentage of students achieving the benchmark.

4.0.4 The program uses Form AS 4 (B) and/or AS4 (M) to report assessment outcomes to its constituents and the public on its website and routinely up-dates (minimally every 2 years) these postings

All Council on Social Work Education programs measure and report student learning outcomes. Students are assessed on their mastery of the competencies that comprise the accreditation standards of the Council on Social Work Education. These competencies are dimensions of social work practice that all social workers are expected to master during their professional training. A measurement benchmark is set by the social work programs for each competency. An assessment score at or above that benchmark is considered by the program to represent mastery of that particular competency.

Outcomes Table: [n=17]

Measure #1-Exam
Measure #2-Portfolio
Measure #3-Field Evaluation

Competency Competency Benchmark Percentage of Students Achieving Benchmark/ Measure Percentage of Students Achieving Benchmark/ Competency
1. Identify as a Professional Social Worker Measure #1- 75%
Measure #2- 75%
Measure #3- 75%
Measure #1- 100
Measure #2- 98
Measure #3- 100
99%
2. Apply Ethical Principles Measure #1- 75%
Measure #2- 75%
Measure #3- 75%
Measure #1 – 85
Measure #2 – 99
Measure #3 – 100
95%
3. Apply Critical Thinking Measure #1- 75%
Measure #2- 75%
Measure #3- 75%
Measure #1 – 92
Measure #2 – 98
Measure #3 – 100
96%
4. Engage Diversity in Practice Measure #1- 75%
Measure #2- 75%
Measure #3- 75%
Measure #1 – 87
Measure #2 – 100
Measure #3 – 100
96%
5. Advance Human Rights/Social and Economic Justice Measure #1- 75%
Measure #2- 75%
Measure #3- 75%
Measure #1 – 84
Measure #2 – 98
Measure #3 – 98
93%
6. Engage Research Informed Practice/Practice Informed Research Measure #1- 75%
Measure #2- 75%
Measure #3- 75%
Measure #1 – 85
Measure #2 – 100
Measure #3 – 100
95%
7. Apply Human Behavior Knowledge Measure #1- 75%
Measure #2- 75%
Measure #3- 75%
Measure #1 – 94
Measure #2 – 97
Measure #3 – 97
96%
8. Engage Policy Practice to Advance Well-Being and Deliver Services Measure #1- 75%
Measure #2- 75%
Measure #3- 75%
Measure #1 – 94
Measure #2 – 100
Measure #3 – 100
98%
9. Respond to Practice Contexts Measure #1- 75%
Measure #2- 75%
Measure #3- 75%
Measure #1 – 94
Measure #2 – 100
Measure #3 – 100
98%
10A. Practice Engagement Measure #1- 75%
Measure #2- 75%
Measure #3- 75%
Measure #1 – 92
Measure #2 – 97
Measure #3 – 100
96%
10B. Practice Assessment Measure #1- 75%
Measure #2- 75%
Measure #3- 75%
Measure #1 – 91
Measure #2 – 100
Measure #3 – 100
97%
10C. Practice Intervention Measure #1- 75%
Measure #2- 75%
Measure #3- 75%
Measure #1 – 98
Measure #2 – 100
Measure #3 – 100
99%
10D. Practice Evaluation Measure #1- 75%
Measure #2- 75%
Measure #3- 75%
Measure #1- 100
Measure #2- 100
Measure #3- 100
100%

 

Faculty

Katherine Shelek-Furbee
Assistant Vice President of Academic Affairs; Professor of Social Work; Program Director; Chair
M.S.W., West Virginia University
B.A., Alderson-Broaddus College
304.829.7189
kshelek-furbee@bethanywv.edu

Melanee W. Sinclair
Associate Professor of Social Work and Coordinator of Field Placements
M.S.W., West Virginia University
B.A., West Virginia Wesleyan College
304.829.7183
msinclair@bethanywv.edu

Requirements

The purpose of the social work program is to prepare the student for entry-level, generalist social work practice. Students accomplish this goal by completing the following courses: SOWO 120, 150, 210, 230, 310, 320, 340, 350, 352, 377, 455, 470, 472, 490, 495; EDUC 203 or PSYC 230; and PSYC 100. Students are advised to take selected liberal arts core courses to complete the social work major. Students majoring in social work are expected to complete the liberal arts required courses before they begin the professional study for the major. Social work practice courses must be taken in sequence, and students may not take the field placement courses (SOWO 470 and SOWO 472) without first completing all required social work courses except SOWO 455 and SOWO 490, which are taken in conjunction with the field placement experience. SOWO 120 is a prerequisite for all courses in social work except SOWO 125-145, 150, 210, 230, and 310. The program does not grant social work course credit for life experience or previous work experience. The Council on Social Work Education (CSWE) accredits the Social Work program at the Bachelor of Social Work level.

The minor in Criminal Justice is designed for those students interested in a career in a criminal justice setting, including probation programs, prisons, or the court system. Students complete the following required courses: CRJU 147, CRJU 148, CRJU 149, CRJU 201, CRJU 211, and two of the following elective courses: CRJU 301, CRJU 311, CRJU 321, INTD 203, CHEM 108, or PSYC 344.

Course Descriptions

SOWO 120 Introduction to Social Welfare and Social Work 3 credits
This course is an examination of the origin and development of social welfare as an institution in the United States. Examination of the role of the social worker and of the place of the profession in society is the focus of study. A field placement is required for this course.

SOWO 125-150 Special Topics in Social Work 2 or 3 credits
Seminars in this series study special topics of mutual interest to faculty and students.

SOWO 125 Family and Child Welfare 2 credits
This course is a comprehensive study of the principal child welfare services. It defines child welfare, placing it as a field of practice within social work, and presents a scheme for the categorization of child welfare problems in terms of role theory. It provides an historical perspective on how and why welfare services developed and describes the current socio-economic context in which they operate. Topics covered include adoption, child abuse and neglect, day care, foster care, and other child caring institutions.

SOWO 130 Drug and Alcohol Abuse 2 credits
This course provides drug and alcohol education to students interested in an enhanced understanding of the effects of drugs and alcohol on individuals, families, and the community at large. Topics covered in the course include the effects of alcohol and drugs on the body, the relationship between alcohol and drug use and mental illnesses, family issues resulting from abuse and addiction, the role of peer pressure, and identification, prevention, and treatment of alcohol and drug addiction.

SOWO 135 Working With the Aged 2 credits
This course is a study of the biological, psychological, social, economic, cultural, and spiritual factors of the aged in society. It is an overview for persons in the helping professions who want to work with older people individually or with members of families, groups, organizations, or communities. Research efforts are presented that illuminate present knowledge about various aspects of aging and about the heterogeneous elderly population in the United States. A field experience is an integral part of the course.

SOWO 145 Women’s Issues Across the Life Span 3 credits
This course is an examination of the dilemmas facing women at various points throughout the life cycle. The study includes an exploration of the historical underpinnings of the women’s movement and the formation of female gender identity in childhood. Subsequent emphasis is on adulthood, middle adulthood, and the later years of life. (This course may be taken for credit as SOCI 145.)

SOWO 150 Social Problems 3 credits
This course introduces the basic concepts and perspectives of the study of society including analysis of the principal institutions, social processes, and social problems experienced in contemporary society. (This course may be taken for credit as SOCI 150.)

SOWO 151-159 1 credit
Courses in this series are activity courses which may be taken only on a credit/no-credit basis.

SOWO 210 Human Diversity 3 credits
This course explores areas of human diversity, including race, religion, gender, national origin, socio-economic status, developmental challenges, sexual minorities, and alternative lifestyles. Using a systems approach to understanding human behavior, students study the impact of diversity on developmental tasks at the micro, mezzo, and macro levels. Interventions, needs of the population, and available community services are explored. Implications for policy, research, and practice are considered. (This course may be taken for credit as SOCI 210.)

SOWO 230 Supportive Counseling 3 credits
This course is designed to help students develop helping, listening, and counseling skills. In particular, students will demonstrate an understanding of the therapeutic relationship, including the skills of active listening, empathy and positive regard, and the issues of resistance, transference, and defense mechanisms. Students will identify the effect of body language and environment on the counseling process. Students will identify and practice the skills needed to provide individual and small group counseling in a social service setting.

SOWO 310 Human Behavior and the Social Environment 3 credits
This course is an exploration of human behavior with the continuing potential for growth and change. The developmental process across the life span is studied with an emphasis on interaction with the social environment at the individual, family, small group, organization, and community levels. The bio-psycho-social-cultural-spiritual determinants of behavior are studied, integrating knowledge of individuals with their environments to build a foundation for the development of professional assessments and interventions. Prerequisite: EDUC 203 or PSYC 230.

SOWO 320 Social Welfare Policies and Services 3 credits
This course is an examination of the social, historical, political, and economic context of social welfare policies and programs. Students gain experience in analysis of specific policy issues and their implications for professional social work practice. Prerequisite: SOWO 120.

SOWO 340 Research Methods and Statistics 3 credits
This course is the study and use of qualitative and quantitative methods. It includes study of statistical and sociological analysis of social phenomena. The statistical study focuses on numbers, frequencies, means, variance, regressions, multivariate analyses and SPSS. The sociological study focuses on the process of conducting social research, the application of statistics, and computer technology. (This course may be taken for credit as SOCI 340.) Prerequisite: SOWO 120.

SOWO 350 Social Work Practice I 3 credits
This course is the first course in knowledge, skill, and value development for generalist practice. Basic theories and concepts and the skills for professional social work practice with individuals are presented. The study focuses on professional values, social work roles, and social work client relationships. Skills in interviewing, data collection, problem solving, planning, case recording, and evaluation are explored and practiced. Social work practice is explored within the context of current programs and practice methods. A field placement is required for this course. Instructor permission is also required. Prerequisite: SOWO 120.

SOWO 352 Social Work Practice II 3 credits
This course is the second course in knowledge, skill, and value development for generalist practice. Basic theories and concepts and the skills for professional social work practice with families and small groups are presented. The study focuses on professional values, social work roles, and social work client relationships. Skills in interviewing, data collection, problem solving, planning, case recording, and evaluation are explored and practiced. Social work practice is explored within the context of current programs and practice methods. A field placement is required for this course. Prerequisite: SOWO 120, 350.

SOWO 377 Junior Seminar 1 credit
The purpose of this course is to prepare junior social work majors to enter the senior field placement experience. Students will identify the process to apply for field placement and current opportunities available for the senior placement, develop resumes, set up interviews, and submit choices for placement. The course will also prepare students for the graduate school application process, field placement and job interviews, and appropriate dress and behavior in the workplace. Prerequisite: SOWO 120

SOWO 455 Social Work Practice III 3 credits
This course is the third course in knowledge, skill, and value development for generalist practice. Basic theories and concepts and the skills for professional social work practice with organizations, communities, and society are presented. The study focuses on professional values, social work roles, and social work client relationships. Skills in interviewing, data collection, problem solving, planning, case recording, and evaluation are explored and practiced. Social work practice is explored within the context of current programs and practice methods. Prerequisite: SOWO 120, 350, 352.

SOWO 470 Field Placement 9 credits
This course is an educationally directed internship experience as a social work practitioner in a social welfare agency or program. Students are assigned to qualified field instructors in designated settings. The field experience involves five full days each week during the fall semester of the senior year. The placement is designed to test and increase student practice skills and formalize the development of a professional identity, with the goal of self-direction and the appropriate use of supervision and consultation within the social work practice setting. Prerequisite: SOWO 120

SOWO 472 Field Placement Seminar 2 credits
This course is an integrative seminar for the transitional role of the student moving from an undergraduate academic setting to the world of work. A field experience is required. (CR/NCR only.) Prerequisites: SOWO 120

SOWO 487-488 Independent Study 1-4 credits
Studies may be planned as extensions of or additions to existing Social Work offerings.

SOWO 490 Senior Project 2-4 credits
This course is a self-directed research project in a selected topic of social work practice designed to allow the student to integrate the professional value, skill, and knowledge base for generalist practice.

SOWO 495 Comprehensive Exams

This course is an administrative placeholder used to record a student’s score on Comprehensive Exams (CR/NCR).

CRJU 147 Introduction to Criminal Justice 3 credits
This course provides the student with an overview of the criminal justice system, including how the various components work together. Students will examine the impact of the courts, Constitution, and laws on the various organizations within the system. This course also presents the student with the definitions of key terms and concepts that will appear throughout the criminal justice curriculum.

CRJU 148 Law Enforcement 3 credits
This course provides the student with an overview of the development of law enforcement organizations throughout American history, with an emphasis on local policing. Students will examine the missions, procedures, and challenges found in local law enforcement agencies. Topics covered in the course include arrest procedures, patrol strategy, community relations, and organizational structure.

CRJU 149 Corrections 3 credits
This course introduces students to the philosophical foundation behind punishment and defines American correctional methods, including incarceration and community-based programs. Students will examine the sentencing process and the challenges of managing a correctional institution. This course also includes analysis of contemporary correctional issues, including privatization and capital punishment.

CRJU 201 Criminal Law and Procedures I 3 credits
This course provides content on the purpose and creation of criminal laws. In addition, students examine the processes involved in prosecuting a criminal case, from the time of arrest through the trial and appeal. Topics covered in this course include arraignment, pre-trial preparation, and courtroom procedures.

CRJU 211 Criminology 3 credits
This course covers content on the science behind the criminal justice system. Students examine the theories and data that have driven changes in the system. In addition, students consider the question of how criminal behavior develops by examining theories related to genetics, biology, psychology, and sociology.

CRJU 301 Criminal Investigation 3 credits
This course provides content on specific investigative techniques and the roles played by criminal investigators. Students examine the laws and court cases that govern interrogations, property seizure, and evidence preservation. The course also provides opportunities for students to practice basic skills related to surveillance and the collection and preservation of crime scene evidence.

CRJU 311 Juvenile Justice 3 credits
This course covers content on the unique characteristics of the juvenile branch of criminal justice. Students examine the crimes and behaviors typical of juveniles and the methods used by law enforcement and social organizations to prevent and correct these behaviors. This course includes a review of the “vocabulary” of juvenile justice and the root causes of delinquency.

CRJU 321 Homeland Security 3 credits
This course introduces students to the various agencies tasked with the mission of protecting America from foreign threats and the methods these agencies employ. Students will examine the major terrorist groups, both foreign and domestic, that present the most serious threats to national security. The course includes a review of the Patriot Act and other legislation related to homeland security.

SOCI 145 Women’s Issues Across the Life Span 3 credits
This course is an examination of the dilemmas facing women at various points throughout the life cycle. The study includes an exploration of the historical underpinnings of the women’s movement and the formation of female gender identity in childhood. Subsequent emphasis is on adulthood, middle adulthood, and the later years of life. (This course may be taken for credit as SOWO 145.)

SOCI 150 Social Problems 3 credits
This course introduces the basic concepts and perspectives of the study of society, including analysis of the principal institutions, social processes, and social problems experienced in contemporary society.(This course may be taken for credit as SOWO 150.)

SOCI 210 Human Diversity 3 credits
This course explores areas of human diversity, including race, religion, gender, national origin, socio-economic status, developmental challenges, sexual minorities, and alternative lifestyles. Using a systems approach to understanding human behavior, students study the impact of diversity on developmental tasks at the micro, mezzo, and macro levels. Interventions, needs of the population, and available community services are explored. Implications for policy, research, and practice are considered. (This course may be taken for credit as SOWO 210.)

SOCI 340 Research Methods and Statistics 3 credits
This course is the study and use of qualitative and quantitative methods. It includes study of statistical and sociological analysis of social phenomena. The statistical study focuses on numbers, frequencies, means, variance, regressions, multivariate analyses and SPSS. The sociological study focuses on the process of conducting social research, the application of statistics, and computer technology. (This course may be taken for credit as SOWO 340.) Prerequisite: SOWO 120.

SOCI 487-488 Independent Study 1-4 credits
Studies may be planned as extensions of or additions to existing offerings.